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In the introduction to Magickal Sex, Horne writes, “You don’t have to be a full-time Witch to be able to enjoy the influence of magick in your life.” Horne then begins her book of sexy spells with a complicated fertility ritual involving marshmallow root, mistletoe, geranium oil, and a Witch’s besom (pp. 2-6). Perhaps potent, the spell is not the best introduction for part-time Witches. A skeptic would not read past the first spell, missing later information, which happens to contain golden knowledge. Because of the abnormality of the ingredients, the fertility ritual does not seem like novice Craft. Horne includes some practical advice for this ritual. She recommends the timing be during the female partner’s ovulation (p. 6). I would like to see greater emphasis placed on natural factors, such as the synchronicity between female and lunar cycles.

In all of Horne’s work, she responds to popular concerns. On Mad Mad House, characters enacted drama between young adults, typical of reality TV shows. In her books, Horne provides spells for modern Wiccans. She wrote Witchin’: A Handbook for Teen Witches and Life’s a Witch for young Wiccans. Because of popular demand, Horne turned her spell casting hand to Aphrodite’s chamber. She wrote Magickal Sex and the Bewitch A Man series, grimoires of love spells and herbal remedies for fertility, sexual dysfunction, and increased sexual pleasure.

Responding to erectile dysfunction, Horne recommends a doctor’s appointment (p. 8). She also provides herbal remedies. I find the moments in Horne’s book like this one to be the most useful and true to her introduction. She reminds the reader to carry out practical tasks in response to medical problems. A Witch who does not consult with a professional regarding erectile dysfunction shows a lack of intelligence. Magick works. But, a Witch who relies solely on magick denies her earthly existence. In some cases, herbal remedies are an alternative to costly medical bills. For such an exception, I encourage close reading of current clinical articles.

Natural and astral magick work with different elements and energies. Herbal remedies, deriving directly from the Earth, are forms of natural magick. In astral magick, also called ceremonial or high magick, the Witch charges spirits, deities, angels, or familiars with her intent. In Curse Tablets and Binding Spells From the Ancient World, John Gager reports on archaic magick, in which the magician attaches a harmful charm to a tablet. Many spells in the Greek Magical Papyri invoke the assistance of a corpse-daemon.

A Witch can exercise her psychic skills with astral magick. She stretches her limits, accessing unearthly realms. Natural magick includes correspondences and is more closely aligned with the mundane world. A Witch can easily practice natural magick while tending to mundane matters. Were he to incorporate a couple of Horne’s suggestions, he would wear a charm bag with cinnamon sticks, dry kidney beans, and chestnuts on his way to the doctor’s office.

Magickal Sex is for male and female readers. Some spells are written for one gender or for the lovers of one gender. For example, in “honor your God,” Horne writes, “Ladies (and men if that’s your choice!) I’m going to show you how to honor and awaken your man to the lusty energies of Pan, Lord of the Forests” (p. 82). The spell could not apply in its original form to heterosexual men or lesbians because the ingredients arouse Pan specifically. Half-man half beast, Pan represents male virility and wildness.

In “all by myself”, Horne addresses male and female masturbation. She gives separate suggestions because of the difference in male and female anatomy. The magickal process is similar, but men and women will raise energy in distinctive ways, respective to their bodily functions (p. 88). Horne also describes men’s and women’s abilities to achieve multiple orgasms (p. 68). She writes that multiple orgasms come (pun intended) to women more naturally. With tantric practice, men can achieve multiple orgasms and can direct the orgasms to magickal causes.

Some spells are written for people attracted to one gender. Horne responds to requests for a particular guy or for meeting women in general. In these cases, Horne’s solutions are gender-ambiguous. Her readers could be of any sexual orientation. Horne’s Bewitch a Man series, including How to Find Him and Keep Him Under Your Spell and Simple Ways to Add a Little Magic to Your Love Life, followed Magickal Sex. The titles seem to address a straight female audience. Horne proves the contrary. Promoting How to Find Him… on her website, she writes, “Smart, fun, wise and enchanting, Bewitch A Man is bewitching for female readers (and men!) as everyone deserves to be happy in love and experience a truly magickal life.”

In general, Fiona Horne protests heterosexism and heterosexual privilege. In “The Pink Witch,” Horne writes, “Witches do not see the emotional and physical union of heterosexual couples as superior to that of lesbian and gay couples. Love and pleasure are sacred to Witches and all Witches are free to explore these in whatever way they choose” (Witch: A Magickal Journey, p. 239). When Horne discusses sexuality in other books, she usually adds a note about acceptance of all sexual orientations.

If you like Magickal Sex, I recommend Sexy Witch by LaSara Firefox (see our review elsewhere on this site).

 

review by Michelle Mueller

Author: Fiona Horne

Thorsons, 2002

pp. 149, $14.95

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